Tuesday, April 13

What is a desktop? What is a server?

See the subject?

Posting this for a discussion on the blog, I was involved in this debate earlier today.  Didn't really participate, I thought it would be a good topic for discussion.

Please leave comments in the comments section below.  What do you define as a desktop, what do you define as a server?

18 comments:

Keith said...

Sorry, I don't have an answer for you. Having tried to explain Opera Unite recently, I'd say the line is blurring.

Computer manufacturers don't help (thinking of Mac Pros using Xeons, which Intel claims is for servers)

Jason Thacker said...

Servers are programs which accept connections from client programs programs.

From a hardware point of view, a server is simply any hardware you trust enough to run the server software reliably enough for your needs.

System manufacturers assemble systems with components that they feel are worthy of your trust and are designed to handle load in proportions more suited for server applications.

Keith said...

Sorry, I don't have an answer for you. Having tried to explain Opera Unite recently, I'd say the line is blurring.

Computer manufacturers don't help (thinking of Mac Pros using Xeons, which Intel claims is for servers)

Keith said...

Sorry, I don't have an answer for you. Having tried to explain Opera Unite recently, I'd say the line is blurring.

Computer manufacturers don't help (thinking of Mac Pros using Xeons, which Intel claims is for servers)

Jason Thacker said...

Servers are programs which accept connections from client programs programs.

From a hardware point of view, a server is simply any hardware you trust enough to run the server software reliably enough for your needs.

System manufacturers assemble systems with components that they feel are worthy of your trust and are designed to handle load in proportions more suited for server applications.

Jason Thacker said...

Servers are programs which accept connections from client programs programs.

From a hardware point of view, a server is simply any hardware you trust enough to run the server software reliably enough for your needs.

System manufacturers assemble systems with components that they feel are worthy of your trust and are designed to handle load in proportions more suited for server applications.

Laurie said...

Probably way too simplistic, but if it is only used by one person (at their desk, at home, their laptop, etc) then it's a "desktop". If it provides services that two or more people access or use (postfix/sendmail, printing, web server, wiki, db, web application, etc) then it's a "server".

Laurie said...

Probably way too simplistic, but if it is only used by one person (at their desk, at home, their laptop, etc) then it's a "desktop". If it provides services that two or more people access or use (postfix/sendmail, printing, web server, wiki, db, web application, etc) then it's a "server".

Laurie said...

Probably way too simplistic, but if it is only used by one person (at their desk, at home, their laptop, etc) then it's a "desktop". If it provides services that two or more people access or use (postfix/sendmail, printing, web server, wiki, db, web application, etc) then it's a "server".

Chad said...

If a gui is present then it is a desktop. No self respecting sysop runs a server with a gui. None of my servers have a gui running on them. ;)

james said...

I like Laurie's answer... I work at a windows shop, so it's a bit easier, all the servers have Server03/08 (and a few ancient 2000), and all the desktops have XP/Vista/7

Chad said...

If a gui is present then it is a desktop. No self respecting sysop runs a server with a gui. None of my servers have a gui running on them. ;)

Chad said...

If a gui is present then it is a desktop. No self respecting sysop runs a server with a gui. None of my servers have a gui running on them. ;)

paulh said...

Server: Provides a service.

Desktop: Does not provide a service.

james said...

I like Laurie's answer... I work at a windows shop, so it's a bit easier, all the servers have Server03/08 (and a few ancient 2000), and all the desktops have XP/Vista/7

james said...

I like Laurie's answer... I work at a windows shop, so it's a bit easier, all the servers have Server03/08 (and a few ancient 2000), and all the desktops have XP/Vista/7

paulh said...

Server: Provides a service.

Desktop: Does not provide a service.

paulh said...

Server: Provides a service.

Desktop: Does not provide a service.